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What’s the most expensive element?

A single, single element.

But you can get the exact same element in three ways, depending on the way you buy it:

a “box” of 100 (or more)

a package of 10 (or more)

a boxed set of 10 (or more)

How many elements do you get for each of these?

The answer is: two elements to a package

a box of 100 will give you 3 elements.

a set of 10 = 8

a boxed set = 6

the boxed set = 8

To a box, each element has a cost. Each element has a cost of 1/24 of a dollar, plus an additional cost of 1/24 of a dollar for a box, and 2/24 for a set. A single element has a cost of $1.25.

And these costs are the only ones you add up over an entire box.

A number of people have commented with links in an email, which I’ve used to gather more of the discussion:

I’ve seen some discussions about the issue; what I’d like to understand is why people believe the “in-line” style is better.

Let’s start with some background on the use of the “in-line” style in the web.

What is inline inline style?

Inline layout means using code between code blocks, instead of between code blocks or outside the code blocks. The term “inline” is a technical term that defines the layout of a document. The term “inline layout” is sometimes used to describe a design where most content is on one side of a page, followed by less content on another side of the page; or where the contents of a section are grouped under an umbrella term, which means there is no separate block on the left side of a page that is not part of the overall flow of the page.

For a web designer, inline layout means using JavaScript to move content around on a page.

On a desktop, the main reason to use inline layout is to allow full screen apps that use HTML to work on smaller screens (like smartphones). There’s also a number of use cases that don’t really make sense in full screen mode, and you could make use of inline layout to create large sites at normal full screen resolutions. On a mobile device (phones, tablets etc) it looks ugly, but this approach would only be supported by a subset of